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Theengs mobile application to read your BLE sensors

I’m excited to announce the release of Theengs Android mobile application, the application uses  Theengs Decoder  to read data from BLE devices and display those to your mobile, you can download it on Google Play (paid app) To stick with the spirit of  OpenMQTTGateway  the app can also be used as a gateway to an MQTT broker! So if you have an Android touch screen, you can install the app and configure it to read BLE sensor data and push it to your favorite Home Automation controller. Note that if you want to run the integration in the background this is possible as an experimental feature (we need your feedback on this). More information on the app documentation . We came a long way from removing the decoding of BLE sensors from OpenMQTTGateway, creating a dedicated  library , creating a  gateway , a Home Assistant  Addon  a data  explorer  and now a  mobile application ! And you know what, this is not the end, we have plans to release the app for other platforms.

Get your BLE sensors data into Home Assistant in a snap without ESP32

 The power of OpenMQTTGateway BLE is now accessible without an ESP32 and can be installed to Home Assistant in a snap.  Theengs Gateway can be installed as an  Addon in Home Assistant thanks to the work of Mihai Ambrosie Here is the process in a few step: Open Home Assistant and navigate to the "Add-on Store". Click on the 3 dots (top right) and select "Repositories". Enter https://github.com/mihsu81/addon-theengsgw in the box and click on "Add." You should now see "TheengsGateway HA Add-on" at the bottom list. Click on "TheengsGateway", then click "Install". Under the "Configuration" tab, change the settings appropriately (at least MQTT parameters). See Parameters. Start the Add-on. No need of creating YAML configuration for the sensors, they are automatically created in the Devices and Entities section. From this, they can be easily added to your dashboards and automation.

OpenMQTTGateway BLE on Windows, Raspberry Pi or Apple MAC !

  From a   long time   it was asked if OpenMQTTGateway could run on a Raspberry Pi. 100% 75% 50% image With the externalization of the part of OMG BLE code into  Theengs Decoder  and the multi-platform compatibility of the library, the doors were wide open to it. By integrating  Theengs Decoder  into a Python script we made a multi-platform  BLE to MQTT gateway  that can run on a Raspberry Pi, Unix, Windows, MAC, and many more. So now if you have a server with a BLE component you can retrieve decoded BLE sensors data and publish those to MQTT. Cherry on the cake,  TheengsGateway  use the same API as OpenMQTTGateway, so it will act in concert with your existing ESP based OpenMQTTGateway. If you use auto-discovery with OMG the sensors data will be automatically retrieved from  TheengsGateway  also! If you have Python and Pip this is as simple as one command: pip install TheengsGateway Full documentation can be found below: theengs.github.io Theengs gateway Multi platform MQTT gateway lev

Externalize the BLE devices decoding in a library - TheengsDecoder

 These last years OMG has grown leveraging different types of libraries for device decoding: RCSwitch at the beginning for RF/433mhz IRRemote and IRRemote ESP8266 for Infrared ESPilight and  RTL_433_ESP  for RF And many others for sensors, actuators, processing, mqtt... I thank all the maintainers and contributors of these libraries, without them, OMG would not exist. As you know OMG support also Bluetooth device decoding and control , we are not relying on a library for this, but rather on the OMG code. This is mainly due to the history, with the first reading of a Mi Flora by an HM10 integrated in November 2017 and the ESP32 reading of this same sensor in January 2018.  After BLE devices were added from time to time to reach a list of more than 25 devices compatible. A lot of other open-source software are using the BLE data broadcasted to propose a similar approach, sometimes dedicated to one or a range of devices, for a particular platform, or for a particular controller. My opini

Get your BLE sensors data into Home Assistant in 5 minutes

You can now upload your board directly from the web browser!  So let's imagine you want to read data from a sensor like a Mi Flora, an LYWSD03MMC, a weight scale, or any other BLE sensor from this list  Plug an ESP32 dev board to your computer USB port Go to this website: https://docs.openmqttgateway.com/upload/web-install.html Select esp32dev-ble Click the install button Depending on your board you may have to press the BOOT button Choose the port that the ESP is connected to. Wait until the process is complete. Release the BOOT button That's it, OMG is now loaded into your ESP32 board without Arduino IDE, platformIO or a binary flasher. Here are the steps in images: Now comes the Home Assistant part: Add the MQTT integration and activate auto discovery Create a user and a password (Configuration->Users) without administrator right for the gateway Well, this is enough for Home Assistant. So let's now connect both: Check the Wifi Access points available with your smartph

Low power ESP32 BLE gateway

For a few years now we are able to read BLE sensors with an ESP32 . These sensors are advertizing their data with a one to many communication principle. This type of BLE communication has the big advantage of being low power for the sensor, these BLE devices can last several months/years on a battery. This is especially interesting with home automation or use cases that don't require a long-range communication. My test regarding BLE range gives outside  around 60m/200ft  with an LYWSD03MMC  (a popular temperature and humidity sensor). That's enough to cover a house with one or a few gateways. Where it could be difficult is when you want to have BLE sensors outside, so as to monitor your vegetable garden moisture, have some temperature sensors into your greenhouse or check that your garage/storage room door is closed. It may be difficult for the sensor to reach the BLE gateway inside and you may not have power outside. Also you may not want to invest into a communication techno

A reliable Raspberry Pi 4B setup with UPS (power bank) and SSD

 After more than 4 years spent in home automation, the thing that bothered me the most was the regular failure of my Pi SD cards. These failures were the consequences of power supply issues and too much IO on the SD card. I could have tried to reduce the IO or to buy a better model of SD card. With a home automation system, you need something that is available when you need it. Not something that stops in the middle of your holidays. So here are the results of my recommendations: For the storage, it is now well known that the SD Card on the PI is subject to corruption, to avoid that you can put your system in read-only mode, try to reduce the writing, or install an SSD. The raspberry pi 4b can now also boot from the SSD. I choose this solution as I wanted to keep the DB on the Pi. For the UPS, I had the occasion to test several Power Bank without satisfaction. Indeed if the power bank you are using doesn't have a pass-through mode, you have a risk that the bank will stop at an unex